Sunday, March 2, 2014

One Kings Lane And An Antique Wedding Trunk



There have been a few times since I have been blogging that I needed to know more about a design style or the historical evolution of a piece of furniture.




  Sometimes I am able to pull information from my memory banks but I like to check my facts before I hit publish. Many times the only place I've found information has been on that contributor encyclopedia site. Not that it isn't a wonderful, informative read but I don't necessarily look like the most informed blogger if I "Wiki-quote".



Who knew that One Kings Lane had a Home Decor Resource Guide?
I was happy to go and check it out when they asked me to look it over and feature it in a blog post.  
Here is a site with so many well informed articles about specific types of furniture, time periods and room decor.


My husband and I love beautiful but functional antiques and enjoy using them to create a comfortable, livable space for today. 
I was intrigued by an article about the evolution of the chest. 
Boxes, chests and trunks are some of my favorite things.



We found this chest when a local antique store was going out of business. It has perfect patina and we were told it was a wedding chest.


I love that something built generations ago to hold a trousseau can still be used to hold mementos and heirlooms.




Our trunk dates from the 19th century. 



It has a compartment for holding jewelry or documents. 
It even has some darling drawers.



We use it as a coffee table but it also stores throws and other treasures. My grandmother's wedding dress is in this trunk, as well as the christening gown worn by three 
generations of my family.


  
My husband's little baby cowboy boots are even in there.



It has what looks to be a handmade hook to hold keys or jewelry. 



I learned from this article that the chest was one of the most important pieces that a household possessed. 


Chests and commodes had to be well constructed, portable for traveling and secure for holding valuables. Their style and decoration reflected the trends of the different eras. The addition of legs and drawers made it the quintessential piece in homes for generations. I was stunned to learn that almost every type of furniture today evolved from the chest.   
  




Ours is well constructed but quite simple.
We aren't the first family to commandeer a trunk as a coffee table, but we love that it functions well and looks good with our new sofa, love seat and media cabinet. 



We opted for a neutral linen look with traditional rolled arms when we bought the sofas about a year ago. We love living with antiques but we like our upholstered pieces to be new and up to date. 
The black pulls of the trunk give reference to the media cabinet, T.V. and vintage piano bench.
The trunk isn't a family heirloom but we love that it mixes well with the other modern pieces in the room. 
It's provides that balance of old and new that we love.


   In the future, as I research furniture or time periods, I will be referring back to the Home Decor Resource Guide and the Home Decor Shopping Handbook over at 
One Kings Lane.




Why don't you hop on over and check out these resources. Maybe while you are there, you will find something in their incredible, ever changing inventory.
Thank you, One Kings Lane.  
Katie   
Linking with,
A Stroll Thru Life  
Savvy Southern Style 










  


5 comments :

  1. You've got a beautiful old trunk to use as a coffee table, Katie. I love the patina and hidden drawers inside!

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  2. I love your blog! Also love the old trunk...I use one for a coffee table too!
    Looking forward to following along!

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  3. Great post, thanks for sharing your home!

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  4. I almost said I love your chest, but that sounded a bit weird, so I'll say I love your trunk! But I enjoyed hearing about what you have stored in it. Priceless!

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  5. Oh I love, love, love that piece and what a fabulous coffee table. Thanks tons for linking to Inspire Me. Hugs, Marty

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